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BADGERPICS

 

 

 

"A unique collection of photographs and videos of

 Badgers in the

Scottish Borders"

 

 

 

 

Click Me if You Dare

 

 

 

TIPS ON BADGER WATCHING - SEE THE 'WHY BADGERS?' PAGE

                           PHOTOGRAPHS OF BADGERS                                                 

Photograph of a badger in the UK, (Meles meles), taken in the moonlight.

A badger ( Meles meles) photographed at dusk.

Photographs of badgers at night are best taken when there is some daylight left and the sky is not totally blacked out. This badger broke off from foraging every few minutes to check the air for danger. A small amount of daylight helps with focusing too.

Canon 5D, 70-200mm lens and 580 EX flash.

 

Are you interested in watching badgers, taking photographs of badgers or video? This web site may be of help. Pass it on to your friends, click the link below.

 

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This site is dedicated to the
 
European Badger (Meles
 
 meles)

The purpose of this site is to inform the reader about this fascinating animal and to offer some advice on observing and taking photographs of badgers in their natural environment.

Photos: John Peters 2009. The photos of badgers on this web site may be reproduced for personal, educational or other non-profit use, so long as the source is acknowledged.

Text has been lifted from several websites and adapted to include my own personal findings or opinions where appropriate.
   

scottishbadgers

Hi, thanks for visiting this site. I'm a keen photographer with a growing  interest in wildlife, badgers in particular.  The main photographs and videos of the badgers were all taken by me at locations in the Scottish Borders , the Southernmost part of Scotland. If you have any comments to make or questions to ask, please use the FORUM for further information.

In many ways I count myself lucky to live on the edge of a country estate, 'Edgerston' in the Scottish Borders. The opportunities for those interested in wildlife are limited only by time, commitment and patience. The more hours I spend photographing and watching these fascinating creatures, the more I admire them for their cleanliness, their habits, their attitudes, their whole way of life. Predictable in many ways but always full of surprises, the badgers (meles meles) at Edgerston are typical of the Eurasian variety.

Why badgers you may ask, and for tips on badger watching, visit the WHY BADGERS page.

An interesting wee tale follows:

Enthusing about badgers at the local village hall one night having presented some Proshow Gold sequences on wildlife, one farmer expressed his opinion to me of badgers labelling them as "dirty beasts" and it was obvious he regarded them as pests. I smiled and let him have his say but I could have pointed out that badgers change their bedding regularly, groom frequently, do not normally take and devour food inside their setts, have external toilets (dung pits) situated away from their home and are actually one of the farmers greatest friends. Rabbits, mice, rats, voles, snails, slugs and other pests are removed from the countryside regularly throughout the year by badgers, doing the farmer a largely unacknowledged service.

Fortunately the badgers at Edgerston are not persecuted by man (no lamping / no digging / no stopping entrances for fox hunting) and as I check the setts on a regular basis, woe betide anyone caught tampering with Brock or his home. There are no busy roads for these badgers to cross so premature deaths from traffic are rare as their foraging grounds are all (as far as I'm aware) within the estate boundaries or on nearby hills.

I've gathered quite a collection of material on the European badger and with an extensive collection of books and information from the Internet, my knowledge and fondness of this mammal has grown. Many of the existing videos and photographs of badgers available on the Internet appear to have been taken in low light or are presented in poor quality and don't really do justice to this shy and timid creature. I hope to address this through the website and by doing so, perhaps people's vision and opinion of badgers will change.

John

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